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You, dear reader, are no doubt involved in moving through a grieving process, or would like to be doing so. You have sustained some significant or personal loss. To fully engage in grieving your loss or losses you probably would want a fuller understanding of what that process entails.
To grieve is to journey through a process that evokes sadness, aloneness, tears, and missing (someone or something important to you), remembering the true worth of who or what was lost, and discovering how to go with one’s life beyond the loss. Perhaps we can now look more closely at each aspect of grieving.

Sadness becomes the companion to one who has lost someone precious to him or her. Sadness can be intense for weeks and months after the loss occurred. Tears very often accompany the sadness and they beg to be released as often as necessary. Tears bring release and relief to the aching heart. They need not be stifled. However, for the person who doesn’t cry or cries very little after a significant loss, there need not be undue concern. He or she is experiencing a keen sense of loss and sadness in a slightly different manner that doesn’t include tears. None-the-less that person is grieving.

Aloneness is felt when a soul-mate, a life companion, and a true friend is lost. In death a connection still exists, but it is more spiritual than physical and tangible . Periods of personal illness or crises of any sort will cause the grieving person to feel more alone than ever, truly sensing the absence of the loved one.

The griever misses intensely the person with whom he or she has shared life and love over many years, or perhaps only a few. Much love and deep caring have been given and received. Thus, there is a sense that much has been lost as a result of the death. Fortunately, there are the memories.

Remembering is an important part of the journey through grief. There are pictures, memories, and mementos to keep the remembering alive for a long time. Hopefully these carry through one’s whole lifetime. In early grief (the first 6-7 months) remembering is hard because it brings forth sadness and tears. But, as weeks and months pass wonderful memories of times shared float into one’s consciousness and in time replace the more painful memories.

As one moves through the grieving process, the sadness, tears, aloneness, and missing (already mentioned) are accompanied by more intense feelings with which one must grapple. They are a part of the grief process and must be looked at and experienced before they can be put to rest.

In time, one must discover how to go on. One looks at how to have renewed purpose and meaning for one’s life. Remembering that this would be the desire of the deceased loved one is important. He or she would want those left behind to have a full, rich, and healthy life for however long it would be. New dreams, new undertakings, health and happiness, as well as expanded relationships are all a part of the wishes and desires they would have for us.  

The grief journey is long and hard, but taking it day by day makes it feasible. With the support and caring of friends, family, and our God, it can be successfully undertaken. Healing of body, mind, and spirit will be the expected outcome.

A funeral Mass will be held at St. Matthias the Apostle Church for Elijah Alexander on Saturday, April 22, 2017, at 9:30 a.m. Interment at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Viewing Friday, April 21, from 6:00-9:00 PM at Gasch’s Funeral Home, 4739 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville, MD 20781

Grief Brief # 7 

This grief note will invite us to focus on multiple losses that we might face as we grieve. These can occur under three separate circumstances. We will consider each of them.

When we lose a significant other we focus primarily upon the loss of an important person in our lives. Our grief can be centered solely upon the loss of that person. Yet, there are many other secondary losses that are connected with our principle loss. Here is how that happens.

Having lost a spouse, we soon recognize that we have perhaps lost a partner, a soul-mate, a friend. We miss the planning, discussing, and decision-making we may have done jointly. Many responsibilities carried during our lives together by the absent partner are now solely ours, whether we are ready for them or not.

When a child dies, no matter what his or her age may be, we feel the loss of being a guiding and caring parent. We feel that we have been robbed of sharing the dreams, pursuits, or the special events like graduations, weddings, job promotions etc. that could have occurred in that child’s life.

When losing a friend, we miss the special sharing and companionship that was ours. Many a life secret or plan was shared with that person who is now absent from our lives.

These added losses, although sometimes discounted, can add to the burden of grief and mourning that a person can experience.

Another aspect of multiple losses takes into account personal tragedies or crises we may face along with the primary loss. These multiple losses can include: a serious illness that befalls us or a person in our family; some grave misfortune that has come to the life of a friend or family member like serious financial troubles, the loss of a job, an accident, etc. Included in this list are the losses that are consequences of natural disasters like floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, or the like. In all of these circumstances our primary grief, surrounding the loss of a deceased loved one, must sometimes be placed on hold temporarily until the new imposing situations are handled. We will grieve for our lost loved one, but only after the crises or significant problems are dealt with and somewhat resolved.

A third aspect of multiple losses weighs upon us when people we have known and cared about for years begin to die. The causes may be aging, illness, catastrophic occurrences that involve many people (ex.9/11, a significant flood), or acts of violence like shootings, stabbings, riots, accidents, suicides, etc. There is a need to choose well how many of these circumstances will call forth our concern, compassion, and personal caring. The burden of our own grieving process will limit the amount of emotional energy that we can invest in any of these circumstances. When we have grieved and healed adequately, we will have the emotional strength and stamina to get more fully involved in caring and reaching out to others.

Thus we see, from what has been described, that grieving can be multi-faceted. Choosing well where our focus, our attention, and energies are placed is very important so that our own healing is not unduly interrupted. The call is to care for our own grieving selves so that we in time may be able to reach out to others in a loving and caring way.

Joseph P. Makowski, long time parishioner, died Thursday, March 9, 2017, after a long illness. A Memorial Mass is scheduled for 1:00 PM on Saturday, March 18, 2017, at St. Matthias the Apostle Church, 9475 Annapolis Rd., Lanham, MD  20706.  The family will receive visitors from 12:00 – 1:00 PM before the Mass.

Bill Cooper, a long time parishioner, died last week. There will be a viewing at Saint Matthias Church on Tuesday, March 7th, from 10:00-11:00 AM.  A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11:00 AM, followed by a burial at the Veterans’ Cemetery in Crownsville, MD,  Please keep the family in your prayers.

Hazel Campbell, a long time parishioner, died this past week.  There will be a viewing at St. Matthias Church on Saturday, March 4th, from 9:30-10:30 AM.  A Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10:30 AM. Burial will be at Resurrection Cemetery in Clinton, MD, following the service.  Please keep the family in your prayers.

We invite you to help your parish save money by giving up your offertory envelopes this Lent!  Enrolling with Faith Direct will provide St. Matthias the Apostle with consistent support and simplify your giving without the wasteful envelopes.  Visit www.faithdirect.net and use our church code: MD41.  Thank you for your continued support of our parish family.

God bless you,

Father Milt

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Saturday Vigil
5:00 PM
7:00 PM (en español)

Sunday Mass Schedule
8:00 AM
9:30 AM
11:30 AM
6:00 PM
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8:30 AM
Holy Days of Obligation
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7:00 AM
12:00 PM
7:30 PM
*unless otherwise announced

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Monday 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
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